As green as it gets: Grundfos Singapore’s new HQ

Project Green Objective

New office and factory

Grundfos Singapore invested SGB 40 million in a new office and factory facility for Grundfos’ Asia Pacific Regional Headquarters. From the outset, the company’s goal was clear – to design and build the most sustainable, efficient and greenest facility possible, and to demonstrate this by achieving the highest possible certification in Singapore – BCA Green Mark Platinum.

From the outset, the company’s goal was clear – to design and build the most sustainable, efficient and greenest facility possible, and to demonstrate this by achieving the highest possible certification in Singapore – BCA Green Mark Platinum.

Formula One technology
To achieve their goal the project team left no stone unturned. For example, they utilised CFD modelling that is normally used in designing Formula One cars to accurately simulate wind velocity during the design of the building’s natural ventilation.

Partnering up to achieve the objective
Grundfos identified key partners at the beginning of the design and construction process who could help deliver a green building. These included Bovis Lend Lease as the main contractor, Danish consultant engineers COWI, and Cofely SEA Pty Ltd for environmental sustainable design consultancy.

SGD 40 million
The new facility is situated in the Tukang Innovation Park. It comprises a two-storey 3,000m2 office building and a 9,000m2 manufacturing and assembly building, and is the workplace for 200 Grundfos employees.

DSC_2795
PHOTO: The roof of the manufacturing building
Solving the challenges

Consulting engineers at work

The consulting engineers on the project worked to design and build a facility equipped with state-of-the-art green technologies and smart engineering. To maximize the building’s energy efficiency, no stone was left unturned.

Ventilation modelling from Formula One
CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) is a computer-based technology used by Formula 1 aerodynamicists to visualize and enhance their understanding of? How cars will perform in wind and other conditions. For the Grundfos’ factory building, the consulting engineers planned to save significant amounts of energy by not using any mechanical ventilation of the factory building.

Making sure it works
This meant utilizing 100% natural ventilation. They came up with a solution that optimised ventilation by installing a jack roof together with a central courtyard and a patio area between the two buildings. This allowed hot air to rise and escape through the roof and courtyard, while also providing adequate cross ventilation. But the team also knew that an average day in Singapore sees the temperature reach 29 oC or more with relative humidity averaging 84%. To be certain that the solution would work, they employed CFD modelling to accurately simulate wind velocity based on the prevailing N and SE winds.

Personal cooling vests
This solution was further enhanced by the distribution of individual Adiabatic vests for personal cooling of workers in the factory area. The vests contain small fans to help workers stay cool.

PHOTO: A Grundfos employee wearing an Adiabatic cooling vest

This solution was further enhanced by the distribution of individual Adiabatic vests for personal cooling of workers in the factory area. The vests contain small fans to help workers stay cool.

Building orientation and envelope
Another important aspect of the design was the orientation of the building on the site to provide the best possible utilisation of natural ventilation, while also minimising heating and artificial lighting requirements. Various solutions were modelled resulting in a building that minimised the west facing façade. Only 15% of the total façade area faces west and there are virtually no west facing windows. This means a greater area of north and south façades to maximise natural ventilation as well as daylight harvesting, which in turn minimizes electrical lighting requirements.

Sustainable construction all the way
Once the design phase was complete, focus moved to the construction process. An important part of the green objective was to embed sustainability here as well by implementing sustainable construction methods, including reusing materials by recycling waste. The building materials used included 30% recycled content. Even the site office made use of recycled furniture, light fittings, fencing, right down to a second-hand fridge in the office!


Results

The results speak for themselves

The impressive results for the new building show that Grundfos really is leading the way when it comes to energy efficiency and sustainable thinking by making sure that the company practices what it preaches. Energy savings of 40% and a power budget that is 55% lower than the requirements of the relevant Singaporean standard are just two of the results. Other highlights include:

Office building
• Air-tight building design with an ultra-low ETTV (Envelop Thermal Transfer Value) of 33.1 W/m2
• Highly energy efficient air-conditioning system – 28% higher efficiency than typical comparable system
• High chiller plant efficiency of 0.74kW/RT, chilled water temperatures of 10 oC and dedicated heat recovery – saving 6.2% or 86,119 kWh/year compared to reference model
• Water efficient fittings throughout – saving 1800 m3/year
• Use of recycled or non-potable water for cooling towers and irrigation
• Enhanced use of natural lighting combined with high efficiency lighting system
• Photo cell sensors for lighting controls – saving 2.9% or 39,000 kWh/year compared to reference model
• USB EcoStrip power strips for plugging in electrical devices at workstations
• Double-glazed windows with high shading coefficient
• Lifts equipped with ‘sleep mode’ to save energy when not in use

Manufacturing and assembly building
• 100% natural ventilation achieved with a jack roof and central courtyard combined with cross ventilation via patio area
• Provision of Adiabatic personal cooling vests for production employees for extra personal cooling
• High efficiency artificial lighting with instant response to daylight via photosensors – saving 13.8% compared to reference model
• High efficiency power distribution using electrical Busbar across factory area

PHOTO: Grundfos pumps and solutions

    Facebook Twitter LinkedIn